Impact of Cleaning Products on Women’s Lungs as Damaging as 20-a-Day Cigarette Habit

There are many alternatives to overly harsh, toxic chemical cleaners. My cleaning repertoire includes hot water, baking soda, vinegar, simple soaps, essential oils and a box of old washcloths and towels that I launder on a weekly basis. Citrus oils are the penultimate cleaner and even serve as solvents for sticky, gummy substances.

This company – doTERRA – is big on essential oils education (see this video, or this one), for videos that specifically address the subject of avoiding cleaning product toxicity). The doTERRA company is famous for producing exceptionally pure oils, as even essential oils have degrees of purity. Diffusing oils in the air is an alternative to scented candles, room sprays, “air fresheners”, which contain formaldehyde to numb your nasal passages, and perfumes. Essential oils also provide an alternative to toxic body products and cosmetics.

If you become a member at my doTERRA webpage, you will also be helping to support the important work of ThoughtCrimeRadio.net – please feel free to use the contact form here to ask me any questions you might have. Read the following and start replacing your harsh chemicals with safe oils now. Essential oils are a frugal way to go – a few drops go a very long way.

And now… why they are important enough that finally I introduced them to you…

Scientists at Norway’s University of Bergen tracked 6,000 people, with an average age of 34 at the time of enrollment in the study, who used the cleaning products over a period of two decades, according to the research published in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

They found that lung function decline in women who regularly used the products, such as those who worked as cleaners, was equivalent over the period to those with a 20-cigarette daily smoking habit.

“While the short-term effects of cleaning chemicals on asthma are becoming increasingly well documented, we lack knowledge of the long-term impact,” said Dr. Cecile Svanes, a professor at the University of Bergen in Norway and senior author of the study.

“We feared that such chemicals, by steadily causing a little damage to the airways day after day, year after year, might accelerate the rate of lung function decline that occurs with age,” Svanes said.

The scientists advised avoiding the products, and instead using microfiber cloths and water.

For the study, experts measured lung function by testing the amount of air those who took part in the study were able to forcefully breathe out.

They then examined the results alongside a questionnaire in which participants had been asked about the frequency of their use of cleaning products.

According to the study, women who used the cleaning products regularly had a markedly decreased lung capacity…

More information, including links to related articles at https://www.newsweek.com/impact-cleaning-products-lung-health-bad-20-day-cigarette-habit-study-810277

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