Knowingly & Willfully | DOJ

The purpose of 18 U.S.C. § 1001 is to prohibit deceptive practices aimed at frustrating or impeding the legitimate functions of government departments or agencies. The statute is viewed as seeking to protect both the operation and the integrity of the government, and “covers all matters confided to the authority of an agency or department.” [From https://www.justice.gov/archives/jm/criminal-resource-manual-904-purpose-statute]

And…

The prohibition of 18 U.S.C. § 1001 requires that the false statement, concealment or cover up be “knowingly and willfully” done, which means that “The statement must have been made with an intent to deceive, a design to induce belief in the falsity or to mislead, but § 1001 does not require an intent to defraud — that is, the intent to deprive someone of something by means of deceit.” The government may prove that a false statement was made “knowingly and willfully” by offering evidence that defendants acted deliberately and with knowledge that the representation was false. The jury may conclude from a plan of elaborate lies and half-truths that defendants deliberately conveyed information they knew to be false to the government.

As used in the statute, the term “knowingly” requires only that the defendant acted with knowledge of the falsity…

The term “willfully” means no more than that the forbidden act was done deliberately and with knowledge, and does not require proof of evil intent. An act is done “willfully” if done voluntarily and intentionally and with the specific intent to do something the law forbids. There is no requirement that the government show evil intent on the part of a defendant in order to prove that the act was done “willfully.”

[From https://www.justice.gov/archives/jm/criminal-resource-manual-910-knowingly-and-willfully]

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