Ubiquitous Chemical linked to tooth decay in children

Children with higher concentrations of a certain chemical in their blood are more likely to get cavities, according to a new study by West Virginia University School of Dentistry researchers.

Manufactured chemical g roups called perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances are universal as a result of extensive manufacturing and use. Although manufacturers no longer use PFAS to make nonstick cookware, carpet, cardboard and other products, they persist in the environment. Scientists have linked them to a range of health problems–from heart disease to high cholesterol–but now R. Constance Wiener and Christopher Waters are exploring how they affect dental health.

They investigated whether higher concentrations of PFAS were associated with greater tooth decay in children. One of them–perfluorodecanoic acid–was linked to dental cavities. Their findings appear in the Journal of Public Health Dentistry.

“Due to the strong chemical bonds of PFAS, it is difficult for them to breakdown, which makes them more likely to be persistent within the environment, especially in drinking water systems,” said Waters, who directs the School of Dentistry’s research labs. “A majority of people may not be aware that they are using water and other products that contain PFAS.”…

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-02/wvu-cfi020620.php

Using Oral-B Glide dental floss might be associated with higher levels of toxic PFAS chemicals in your body, according to a new peer-reviewed study of consumer behaviors potentially linked to the substances.

PFAS, or per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, are potentially harmful chemicals often used for their water and grease resistance.

The study, which aimed to explain how these chemicals enter the human body, was published Tuesday in the Journal of Exposure Science & Environmental Epidemiology and comes from the Silent Spring Institute in Newton, Massachusetts, and Public Health Institute in Berkeley, California.

Researchers found higher levels of PFHxS (perfluorohexanesulfonic acid), a PFAS, in women who flossed with Oral-B Glide compared to those who didn’t.

“This is the first study to show that using dental floss containing PFAS is associated with a higher body burden of these toxic chemicals,” lead author Katie Boronow, a scientist at Silent Spring, said in a statement.

Among the other behaviors in the study that were associated with higher PFAS levels: Having stain-resistant carpet or furniture and living in a city with drinking water contaminated by a PFAS.

Researchers also found that African-American women who ate food from coated cardboard containers had higher PFAS levels for four of the chemicals studied compared to those who didn’t….

https://phi.org/news-events/1552/oral-b-glide-floss-tied-to-potentially-toxic-pfas-chemicals-study-suggests

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.