China Hunting Down Coronavirus Critics

It should be noted that the US regime is also desperate to control the narrative, to deflect attention away from their own culpability and their ongoing bioterror research, and to streamline the march to universal mandatory injections with unknown substances.

China’s notoriously militant censorship has been turned up to eleven during the coronavirus outbreak. They have made it illegal for healthcare workers, crematoriums, and anyone else involved in the response to discuss the situation – disrupting attempts to provide an accurate picture of what’s going on amid the largest quarantine in human history.

Beijing is also using their Orwellian grip over their internet to crack down on the spread of information from citizen journalists, such as Fang Bin and Chen Qiushi – who recorded dozens of reports on the situation in Wuhan, and have both disappeared.

VICE has taken an in-depth look at China’s draconian efforts to control the narrative around the coronavirus outbreak, including their efforts to leverage online platforms to hunt down those spreading non-sanctioned information.

WeChat Crackdown

Beijing has been going to great lengths to track down users on Twitter and WeChat in order to quash negative news from being shared online – using intimidation, arrests, and threats of legal action.

Joshua Left, a 28-year-old entrepreneur who runs a self-driving car startup in Wuhan, China, arrived in San Francisco in mid-January for a vacation, just as the first reports of a new “SARS-like” virus outbreak in China reached the U.S.

He almost immediately began worrying about his family back in his hometown of Wuhan, where the disease appeared to originate, and where panic was starting to set in. Concerned that his family might not be getting information on the scale of the burgeoning epidemic, he posted messages on his WeChat account sharing information he was afraid were not available inside China.

But then things started to get weird,” he told VICE News.

Left, who asked not to be identified by his full Chinese name, said he first received a warning message from WeChat administrators. Then he began receiving strangely specific messages that appeared to come from four of his friends on WeChat, all asking him for his location, what hotel he was staying at in San Francisco, what his room number was, and what his U.S. phone number was.

Then his cell phone received a warning message that someone in Shanghai was trying to log into his account.

Finally, when he wouldn’t tell them where he was staying, the same accounts all simultaneously began urging him to return to China as soon as possible. –VICE

Left has reported the incident to the San Francisco Police Department and the FBI, however no action has been taken by either.

China is also monitoring Twitter. While banned in the country, many are accessing the platform using virtual private networks (VPNs) – which are also illegal….

https://www.zerohedge.com/geopolitical/china-hunting-down-coronavirus-critics-heres-how

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