Success: Staggering Death Toll in Iraq Keeps Climbing

March 19 marks 15 years since the U.S.-UK invasion of Iraq in 2003, and the American people have no idea of the enormity of the calamity the invasion unleashed. The U.S. military has refused to keep a tally of Iraqi deaths. General Tommy Franks, the man in charge of the initial invasion, bluntly told reporters, “We don’t do body counts.” One survey found that most Americans thought Iraqi deaths were in the tens of thousands. But our calculations, using the best information available, show a catastrophic estimate of 2.4 million Iraqi deaths since the 2003 invasion.

The number of Iraqi casualties is not just a historical dispute because the killing is still going on today. Since several major cities in Iraq and Syria fell to Islamic State in 2014, the U.S. has led the heaviest bombing campaign since the American War in Vietnam, dropping 105,000 bombs and missiles and reducing most of Mosul and other contested Iraqi and Syrian cities to rubble.

An Iraqi Kurdish intelligence report estimated that at least 40,000 civilians were killed in the bombardment of Mosul alone, with many more bodies still buried in the rubble. A recent project to remove rubble and recover bodies in just one neighborhood found 3,353 more bodies, of whom only 20% were identified as ISIS fighters and 80% as civilians. Another 11,000 people in Mosul are still reported missing by their families.

Of the countries where the U.S. and its allies have been waging war since 2001, Iraq is the only one where epidemiologists have actually conducted comprehensive mortality studies based on the best practices that they have developed in war zones such as Angola, Bosnia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Guatemala, Kosovo, Rwanda, Sudan and Uganda. In all these countries, as in Iraq, the results of comprehensive epidemiological studies revealed 5 to 20 times more deaths than previously published figures based on “passive” reporting by journalists, NGOs or governments.

Two such reports on Iraq came out in the prestigious The Lancet medical journal, first in 2004 and then in 2006. The 2006 study estimated that about 600,000 Iraqis were killed in the first 40 months of war and occupation in Iraq, along with 54,000 non-violent but still war-related deaths….

http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/49001.htm

Oh what the hell.  I don’t know any of them personally.  They’re just numbers to me.   And the rationale for killing them and genetically poisoning their offspring for many many generations seemed plausible at the time.  Something about … what was it?  I forget.  Something to do with evildoers and my crush on Rachel Maddow.   And so what if it was all based on knowing, premeditated lies?  It didn’t affect me personally.  As long as our luciferian overlords are distracted elsewhere maybe they’ll leave me alone for awhile longer.   They’ve already killed my foreskin.  I’ve learned my lesson.

First they came for the children and I didn’t speak out because I wasn’t a child

Then they came for the human beings and I didn’t speak out because I wasn’t human

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This is CNN, and CBS and NBC and ABC and MSNBC and NYT and the Brainwashington Compost and the entire US MSM

 

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