Epidemic of Fraudulent Masectomies

Women all across America are being conned into medically unnecessary breast removal surgery (bilateral mastectomy surgery) by doctors who scare them with “fake science” by falsely describing genetic testing results, warn researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

Women who have harmless genetic variants called VUS (Variants of Uncertain Significance) are falsely being told by nearly half of all breast cancer surgeons that they have the “breast cancer gene” (BRCA1 or BRCA2) and therefore must have the surgery to save their lives. Famously, Angelina Jolie underwent a bilateral mastectomy after being told she carried the gene for breast cancer, but these new findings by Stanford researchers call into question whether her surgery was medically necessary at all.

In essence, Stanford University researchers reveal that unscrupulous cancer surgeons are defrauding patients with “fake science” scare tactics. This is also raising health care expenditures of pension programs, private insurance and public insurance systems such as Obamacare, causing governments to waste huge amounts of money on medically unjustified surgery. Not coincidentally, the more dishonest cancer surgeons can scare women into agreeing to surgical procedures, the more money they make for themselves (regardless of the medical necessity of the procedure). In essence, the “fake science” of misinterpreting genetic testing results has become a lucrative revenue source for the breast cancer surgery industry.

“Our findings suggest a limited understanding among physicians and patients of the meaning of genetic testing results,” said Allison Kurian, MD, associate professor of medicine and of health research and policy at Stanford, as reported in this Stanford media release.

In other words, it’s incredibly easy for doctors to trick patients with sciency-sounding scare stories, knowing that few patients can interpret genetic testing results on their own. Dr. Kurian goes on to explain that doctors are knowingly scaring women who have these non-risky variants into falsely believing they have “breast cancer genes.”

She explains, “Clinical practice guidelines state that variants of uncertain significance should not be considered to confer high cancer risk, and that patients with these variants should be counseled similarly to a patient whose genetic test is normal. However, many of the physicians surveyed in our study stated that they manage these patients in the same way as they do patients with mutations known to increase a woman’s risk.” …

http://naturalnews.com/2017-04-17-women-being-conned-into-mastectomy-surgery-by-doctors-who-scare-them-with-false-genetic-testing-results.html

Firefox goes Orwellian

For some reason I thought an open source project like mozilla would have some respect for democratic principles and the intelligence of its users.  But when I just tried to access

http://memoryholeblog.com/2013/04/22/witnessing-bostons-mass-casualty-event/

an excellent site which has been covering the staged-managed media fantasies marketed as reality recently, it warned me that google had labelled it an “attack site” and sent me to a cul-de-sac from which there was no escape.  Even clicking on the link “I want to go there anyway” sent me to mozilla page lecturing me on the dangers of visiting unapproved sites, trashed the history path leading up to the page so I couldn’t back up and disabled the link to return to where I started.   It finally relented when I opened a new tab and pasted the link in it.  This is firefox 52.0.1.

Clearly google has become completely politicized and firefox is following them like a sheep in a herd.  Somebody needs to talk some sense to them.   The link to “take me there anyway” should do exactly that.   If the development team thinks they can trust the establishment they need only look between their legs (if they’re male, that is).  Clearly people need a new paradigm for how socioeconomic systems “think.”    A democratic society does not need information enforcement.

There are various promising options under “about:config” but I haven’t tinkered with it yet.