Junk Food and Social Control

When considering the cause of national apathy, Americans are evidently physiologically and socially similar to the junk food addled laboratory rat. Both tolerate repressive environments while confined against their will in a maze. In the natural desire to escape and find freedom, like the affected rat, Americans passively accept their confinement, acquiescing without struggle to a life of controlled stimulation and manipulation by all manner of drugs, tests, and mandated choice of direction. In a country objectively descending into chaos, why don’t Americans care? In recent studies at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), these same rats evidence one reason for America’s irrational disinterest in self-preservation.

In ever-more-frequent and growing worldwide protests, resistance to the American empire’s imposed maze increases. Strangely, Americans offer no similar resistance at all. The social, economic, and political problems in the USA mirror those of an empire-afflicted world, yet in the “exceptional” nation most would rather chew off their tails than find the energy to extricate themselves from their maze. Examples of exceptionally paltry public resistance and protest abound. Rarely does an American protest amount to more than a few hundred temporarily outraged souls who then quickly return to their couches when told to do so by the well-armed militia of the government they came into the streets to change.

Why is America the isolated case study of this strange domestic malady that may best be summed-up as: clinical, terminal apathy?

The cause of this national apathy seems to be clear as shown in results from the UCLA study: it’s the food. Processed, adulterated, adjunct-laden, GMO-filled junk food; the preferred and almost unavoidable daily diet of Americans.

Dr. Aaron Blaisdell, a professor of psychology at the UCLA /College of Letters and Science and a member of UCLA’s Brain Research Institute, used rats to determine if a diet of poor quality processed foods resulted directly in obesity, or if the actual initial result was fatigue.

Dr. Blaisdell’s team placed thirty-two female rats on one of two diets for six months. The first received a standard rat’s diet, consisted of relatively unprocessed foods like ground corn and fish meal. As a substitute for a junk food diet the second Americanized group received highly processed food of lower quality that included substantially more sugar. As expected, “One diet led to obesity, the other didn’t,” said Blaisdell, as quoted in UCLA’s, “Newsroom.” However…

“Our data suggest that diet-induced obesity is a cause, rather than an effect, of laziness [apathy],” concluded Blaisdell. “…the [poor quality] diet causes obesity, which causes fatigue.”

The rats were given a task in which they were required to press a lever to receive a food or water reward. The rats on the junk food diet demonstrated impaired performance, taking substantially longer breaks than the lean rats before returning to the task. During repeated 30-minute sessions the overweight rats became more lazy due to their increasing obesity, taking breaks that were nearly twice as long as clean rats.

Dr. Blaisdell’s studying clearly indicates that junk food, while causing obesity, subsequently causes laziness and fatigue. Combined, the political cousin of these two symptoms is: apathy.

By all metrics, Americans consume the most quantity of the worst-quality food supply in the developed world, as such leading in obesity. In America this endemic apathy is causing Americans to have little interest in their own increasing domestic peril. In a nation of increasing authoritarian governmental control, American processed junk food may have now become the most effective US government weapon for controlling the reactions of its own population. Examples of irrational American apathy are evident every week. …

http://www.activistpost.com/2016/03/terminal-apathy-what-rats-say-about-americans.html