18-year-old tackles a huge global problem – water purity

Perry created a first of its kind fully renewable carbon nano tube filter that can remove over 99% of toxic heavy metals such as mercury and lead from industrial and domestic waste water. This discovery is of significance to people in both developing and developed worlds as soluble heavy metals can cause serious health disorders when investigated… 

Perhaps the best part of this story is that Perry has decided to make his project open source, so that other researchers around the world can pick up his work and make further improvements without worrying about infringing on his patents…

Perry Alagappan was awarded the Stockholm Junior Water Prize at World Water Week for this invention. He also won an AXA Achievement Scholarship. He was accepted to study at Stanford, and began working on his undergraduate Pre-engineering degree there this fall.

Read more at http://growyourowngroceries.org/one-young-man-tackles-a-huge-global-problem/

Hidden Tragedy of the CIA’s Experiments on Children

Bobby is seven years old, but this is not the first time he has been subjected to electroshock. It’s his third time. In all, over the next year, Bobby will experience eight electroshock sessions. Placed on the examining table, he is held down by two male attendants while the physician places a solution on his temples. Bobby struggles with the two men holding him down, but his efforts are useless. He cries out and tries to pull away. One of the attendants tries to force a thick wedge of rubber into his mouth. He turns his head sharply away and cries out, “Let me go, please. I don’t want to be here. Please, let me go.” Bobby’s physician looks irritated and she tells him, “Come on now, Bobby, try to act like a big boy and be still and relax.” Bobby turns his head away from the woman and opens his mouth for the wedge that will prevent him from biting through his tongue. He begins to cry silently, his small shoulders shaking and he stiffens his body against what he knows is coming.

From early 1940 to 1953, Dr. Lauretta Bender, a highly respected child neuropsychiatrist practicing at Bellevue Hospital in New York City, experimented extensively with electroshock therapy on children who had been diagnosed with “autistic schizophrenia.” In all, it has been reported that Bender administered electroconvulsive therapy to at least 100 children ranging in age from three years old to 12 years, with some reports indicating the total may be twice that number. One source reports that, inclusive of Bender’s work, electroconvulsive treatment was used on more than 500 children at Bellevue Hospital from 1942 to 1956, and then at Creedmoor State Hospital Children’s Service from 1956 to 1969. Bender was a confident and dogmatic woman, who bristled at criticism, oftentimes refused to acknowledge reality even when it stood starkly before her.

Despite publicly claiming good results with electroshock treatment, privately Bender said she was seriously disappointed in the aftereffects and results shown by the subject children. Indeed, the condition of some of the children appeared to have only worsened. One six-year-old boy, after being shocked several times, went from being a shy, withdrawn child to acting increasingly aggressive and violent. Another child, a seven-year-old girl, following five electroshock sessions had become nearly catatonic.

Years later, another of Bender’s young patients who became overly aggressive after about 20 treatments, now grown, was convicted in court as a “multiple murderer.” Others, in adulthood, reportedly were in and of trouble and prison for a battery of petty and violent crimes. A 1954 scientific study of about 50 of Bender’s young electroshock patients, conducted by two psychologists, found that nearly all were worse off after the “therapy” and that some had become suicidal after treatment. One of the children studied in 1954 was the son of well-known writer Jacqueline Susann, author of the bestselling novel “Valley of the Dolls.” Susann’s son, Guy, was diagnosed with autism shortly after birth and, when he was three years old, Dr. Bender convinced Susann and her husband that Guy could be successfully treated with electroshock therapy. Guy returned home from Bender’s care a nearly lifeless child. Susann later told people that Bender had “destroyed” her son. Guy has been confined to institutions since his treatment. …

http://www.truth-out.org/archive/item/91211:the-hidden-tragedy-of-the-cias-experiments-on-children

Would it have been less of a tragedy if it was just business as usual for psychiatry?

Truthout doesn’t get it.  This is a psychiatric success story.  This is what they do for a living, and it’s very good at generating repeat business.   Their pseudo-scientific lies and cruelty are the stuff of horror novels (literally!)  Normal people can’t fathom the depth of their rage.   I know for a fact that at the highest levels of the “mental health” bureaucracy, it’s not a matter of well-intentioned ignorance.  They quite literally don’t care what they do to their patients.  It’s about the money.    Psychiatric schools are magnets for psychopaths.   It’s probably a front for satanists.  It should be shut down as a form of organized crime.

Ruling in Mexico Sets Into Motion Legal Marijuana – The New York Times

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The Mexican Supreme Court opened the door to legalizing marijuana on Wednesday, delivering a pointed challenge to the nation’s strict substance abuse laws and adding its weight to the growing debate in Latin America over the costs and consequences of the war against drugs.

The vote by the court’s criminal chamber declared that individuals should have the right to grow and distribute marijuana for their personal use. While the ruling does not strike down current drug laws, it lays the groundwork for a wave of legal actions that could ultimately rewrite them, proponents of legalization say…

“There is an enormous institutional and social cost to enforcing the laws against marijuana,” said Ms. Pérez Correa, whose surveys of state and federal prisons suggest that 60 percent of the inmates sentenced for drug crimes were convicted in cases involving marijuana. “How many resources are being used up to reduce these low-impact crimes?”…