Infant antibiotic use linked to adult diseases, possibly autism

The study, led by Biomedical Informatics and Computational Biology program graduate student fellow Pajau Vangay, also developed a predictive model with potential clinical importance for measuring healthy development of bacteria in the gut of young children. The findings were published today in the scientific journal Cell Host & Microbe.

Antibiotics are by far the most common prescription drugs given to children. They account for about one-fourth of all medications prescribed to children, with a third of these prescriptions considered unnecessary. Other studies have shown profound short- and long-term effects of antibiotics on the diversity and composition of the bacteria in our bodies, called our microbiome.

“Diseases related to metabolism and the immune system are increasing dramatically, and in many cases we don’t know why,” said the study’s senior author Dan Knights, a computational biologist and assistant professor in the University of Minnesota’s Department of Computer Science and Engineering and Biotechnology Institute. “Previous studies showed links between antibiotic use and unbalanced gut bacteria, and others showed links between unbalanced gut bacteria and adult disease. Over the past year we synthesized hundreds of studies and found evidence of strong correlations between antibiotic use, changes in gut bacteria, and disease in adulthood.” …

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/05/150513140929.htm

Possible role of gut bacteria in autism

Autism: for a condition that continues to confound researchers and physicians alike, Dr. Richard E. Frye, Director of Arkansas Children’s Hospital (ACH) autism research program, believes that research into the role of the microbiome could hold a key to new treatments and understanding of autism.

Last summer, Dr. Frye led a group of international, pioneering physicians and scientists, as well as parents, at the 1st International Symposium on the Microbiome in Health and Disease with a Special Focus on Autism. At this historic conference autism researchers called for a new frontier in science and autism research: the connection between the enteric (gut) microbiome and autism.

“Mounting evidence shows us that there is a link between the gut and brain; that the gut may have previously under-recognized influences on cognition and possibly even behavior,” said Dr. Frye, a leading autism researcher who serves as Director of both ACH’s Integrated Autism Research Program and Autism Multispecialty Clinic. “Several lines of research also point to the possibility that changes in the gut either cause or are highly associated with driving core ASD (autism spectrum disorder) symptoms.” The microbiome-autism connection is one of several promising avenues being examined as part of their integrated research program at Arkansas Children’s Hospital Research Institute. …

But let’s be sure and keep them on “formula” or at the very least, wean them from BF as soon as possible.  BF is so disturbing to the public, it should be illegal.   Maybe they can attach a rider to the mandatory vaccination bill currently in congress.

Can there be any doubt that there’s something very wrong with conventional pediatric medicine?

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