US torture schools in Latin America

The world quietly celebrated Human Rights Day (December 10) earlier this month. That week, two big, interrelated human rights events occurred.

The first was the well-publicised revelations that America’s CIA ran and participated in a global torture program which, more than anything, produced vast ambivalence – especially from the top.

The US Senate report recounted, in at times excruciating detail, the CIA’s program after September 11. The program detained – often incorrectly – and tortured those suspected of terrorism. This report not so much provided a watershed moment in America’s self-understanding, but rather revealed how much further it has to go. The report did not lay to rest the public debate on torture: former vice president Dick Cheney said he had “no problem” with detaining innocents.

The second was not so well-publicised, but equally as significant.  In Brazil, the National Truth Commission submitted its final report. It was the first time that the Brazilian state began to account for its human rights violations and atrocities during the military regime of 1964-85. This forced a public discussion on a regime that Brazil had previously buried in the past.

As history can strangely often do, these serendipitous events provide a snapshot of where countries are in their national reckoning.

US torture schools

For many, the reports’ revelations do not come as a surprise. Many in Latin America and human rights groups have known for years that the US has been practising, and teaching the world, torture. These techniques and shared intelligence with the US were widespread through Latin America as part of what was known as Operation Condor.

Operation Condor was a secret intelligence system in the 1970s through which South American military states shared intelligence and seized, tortured and executed political opponents in one another’s territory, under the United States’ watch and instruction.

In J. Patrice McSherry’s book Predatory States: Operation Condor and Covert War in Latin America, she concluded that “US forces laid the groundwork for Operation Condor” by working:

… behind the scenes with the Latin American military and intelligence forces that comprised the Condor Group, providing resources, administrative assistance, intelligence, and financing.

The result was state run-terror across nearly the entire continent. Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet was the most well-known head of state responsible for torture. In this time, hundreds of thousands of Latin Americans were tortured, killed, disappeared or imprisoned without trial, with the help of Washington.

The training of Latin American security forces for Operation Condor, as well as other human rights violations, occurred at the now-infamous School of the Americas, now known as the Hemisphere Institute for Security Co-operation.

At this “school”, they explicitly taught unlawful and brutal interrogations and the targeting of civilians to instil fear. However, no-one has been prosecuted for the creation of this school, nor for the “torture manuals” which were distributed to governments all over the continent.

Brazil’s search for truth

The National Truth Commission report not only revealed what the Brazilian dictatorship did, but how US military officials spent years teaching torture techniques to Brazilian forces.

Importantly, the Brazilian report had much more scope and power than that of the United States. It named officials and recommended a revision to the 1979 Amnesty Law so that perpetrators can be prosecuted. It called on the military to take responsibility for its “grave violations” and noted that problems still exist within the armed forces.

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff, herself a victim of torture, said through tears that:

“Brazil deserves the truth, the truth means above everything the opportunity to reconcile ourselves and our history.”

Compare this to US President Barack Obama’s reaction:

“These techniques did significant damage to America’s standing in the world and made it harder to pursue our interests with allies and partners.” …

http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2014/12/latin-america-lessons-us-torture.html

War Always Comes Home

…  “To practice torture is to self-identify as a repressive police state, even if the practice is reserved only for conduct outside one’s own borders. But it’s just a matter of time before it spills back into domestic territory. Historically, it always has.”

It always has … for thousands of years.

Indeed, all of the facets of militarization abroad are coming home.

Postscript:  Torture is already arguably occurring occurring in U.S. prisons.

http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2014/12/just-matter-time-u-s-torture-spills-back-domestic-territory-historically-always.html

This is why it’s so very important that everyone reflexively believe washington’s fairy tale on 9/11.   For god’s sake don’t actually check the evidence for yourself.   You might be tortured sooner rather than later.

At least the germans under hitler could say they had no way of knowing the truth about the reichstag fire.  Americans have no such excuse.

“Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities”.  –Voltaire

One thought on “US torture schools in Latin America”

Leave a Reply