Autarky, aristocracy, autocracy and amorality

autarky |ˈôˌtärkē| noun
economic independence or self-sufficiency.
• a country, state, or society that is economically independent.
ORIGIN early 17th cent.: from Greek autarkeia, from autarkēs ‘self-sufficiency,’ from autos ‘self’ + arkein ‘suffice.’

aristocracy |ˌariˈstäkrəsē| noun
the highest class in certain societies, esp. those holding hereditary titles or offices : the ancient Polish aristocracy had hereditary right to elect the king.
• a form of government in which power is held by the nobility.
• a state governed in this way.
• figurative a group regarded as privileged or superior in a particular sphere : high-level technocrats make up a large part of this “technical aristocracy.”
ORIGIN late 15th cent.: from Old French aristocratie, from Greek aristokratia, from aristos ‘best’ + -kratia ‘power.’ The term originally denoted the government of a state by its best citizens, later by the rich and wellborn, hence the sense [nobility,] regardless of the form of government (mid 17th cent.).

autocracy |ôˈtäkrəsē| noun
a system of government by one person with absolute power.
• a regime based on such a principle of government.
• a country, state, or society governed in such a way.
• domineering rule or control : a boss who shifts between autocracy, persuasion, and consultation.
ORIGIN mid 17th cent. (in the sense [autonomy] ): from Greek autokrateia, from autokratēs (see autocrat).

amorality |ˌāməˈralitē| noun
lacking a moral sense; unconcerned with the rightness or wrongness of something : an amoral attitude to sex.
USAGE See usage at immoral : Immoral means ‘failing to adhere to moral standards.’ Amoral is a more neutral, impartial word meaning ‘without, or not concerned with, moral standards.’ An immoral person commits acts that violate society’s moral norms. An amoral person has no understanding of these norms, or no sense of right and wrong; the word may refer to a ‘social deviant.’ Amoral may also mean ‘not concerned with, or outside the scope of morality’ (following the pattern of apolitical, asexual). Amoral, then, may refer to a judicial ruling that is concerned only with narrow legal or financial issues. Whereas amoral may be simply descriptive, immoral is judgmental.

In bygone days, everyone was independent and self-sufficient – autarkic. There were no possessions and there was no money, for everything was given free by Mother Nature. Then, along came a clever class that invented a new game – Monopoly – ownership, exchange, competition, money, castles and a history of its own making. Taxes were invented. Autarky went out the window. No one could live on planet Earth free of the game of Monopoly – a game in which a few won and most lost.

Aristocrats used wealth, wiles and hired hands they called “soldiers” to devastate and force villages to join into towns and towns into cities and cities into states, and states into countries. Lines were drawn in the sand and on the maps of the globe – and these lines were taken very seriously by all the little people who forgot that they once were autarkic.

Aristocrats competed one with another and went to great lengths to extend and protect their power and possessions. They gladly sacrificed the common people pawns to win another round of rich boy chess. They rewarded themselves with thrones, crowns, robes and titles.

Yet, as competitive as they were with one another, there was one way in which aristocrats gladly cooperated. They sat together in boardrooms, smoked cigars, and laughed uproariously as they made up outrageous stories aimed at convincing the good, simple, loving, peaceful, respectful people that their homes, families and friends were in danger, so they would be moved to fight other good, simple, loving, peaceful, respectful people – all for “national security” purposes… yes, this they all agreed on.

Thus was man set against man and country pit against country. And out of this was born man’s inhumanity to man, for aristocratic autocrats reward cruelty with medals and ribbons and parades, metal discs and pieces of paper with dollar signs printed on them.

The lines you see on the globe are not there when you visit in person, or even when you fly above the earth. The lines you see on globes are artificial boundaries, invented by those who take the lines and themselves very seriously. They continue to be committed to their own vision of the world – where judgment, degradation, separation, competition, violence, bloodshed, material possessions, power, and the deaths of millions – nay, billions – are all thought to be good things. “Good for business; bad for the people.”

The following little movie tells the tale of ownership and territoriality rather well:  The Gods Must Be Crazy. Compliments of Crackle.com…

TheGodsMustBeCrazy

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