Gardasil genetic fingerprints found in postmortem brain samples of victims

A recent study published in the open-access journal Pharmaceutical Regulatory Affairs provides shocking new evidence that viral components contained in the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine Gardasil are capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier and triggering cerebral vasculitis, a severe form of blood vessel inflammation in the brain that can lead to severe autoimmune disorders and even death.

A postmortem assessment of two young girls from opposite ends of the world who died recently after being given the Gardasil vaccine revealed fragments of the HPV-16L1 antigen, which is added to both Gardasil (Merck & Co.) and Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline), inside the girls’ brain tissue. According to the study’s authors, these particles represent a genetic fingerprint of the Gardasil vaccine, which is now clearly exposed as causing serious, adverse events in at least some of the girls that receive it.

For their research, Dr. Chris Shaw from the University of British Columbia (UBC) in Canada and Dr. Lucija Tomljenovic from the Neural Dynamics Research Group in Vancouver examined samples of brain tissue taken from both girls, one 19 years old and the other 14 years old. Their analysis focused specifically on the potential presence of both HPV-16L1 and HPV-18L1, two specific antigens used in HPV vaccines.

Much to their surprise, the researchers observed that HPV-16L1 had bound itself to the walls of cerebral blood vessels in both of the girls’ brains. They also noticed increased T-cell signaling in both brain tissue samples, as well as the marked activation of the classical antibody-dependent complement pathway in the cerebral vascular tissues. Put more simply, viral components of Gardasil that never should have crossed over into the brain, were found to be fully capable of doing precisely this.

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