Fitts: The Ultimate Cold Call

An oldie but goodie:

Narco-Dollars For Dummies (Part 3)
How The Money Works In The Illicit Drug Trade

By Catherine Austin Fitts

 

In late June 1999, numerous news services, including Associated Press, reported that Richard Grasso, Chairman of the New York Stock Exchange flew to Colombia to meet with a spokesperson for Raul Reyes of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Columbia (FARC), the supposed “narco terrorists” with whom we are now at war.

The purpose of the trip was “to bring a message of cooperation from U.S. financial services” and to discuss foreign investment and the future role of U.S. businesses in Colombia.

Some reading in between the lines said to me that Grasso’s mission related to the continued circulation of cocaine capital through the US financial system. FARC, the Colombian rebels, were circulating their profits back into local development without the assistance of the American banking and investment system. Worse yet for the outlook for the US stock market’s strength from $500 billion – $1 trillion in annual money laundering – FARC was calling for the decriminalization of cocaine.

To understand the threat of decriminalization of the drug trade, just go back to your Sam and Dave estimate and recalculate the numbers given what decriminalization does to drive BIG PERCENT back to SLIM PERCENT and what that means to Wall Street and Washington’s cash flows. No narco dollars, no reinvestment into the stock markets, no campaign contributions.

It was only a few days after Grasso’s trip that BBC News reported a General Accounting Office (GAO) report to Congress as saying: “Colombia’s cocaine and heroin production is set to rise by as much as 50 percent as the U.S. backed drug war flounders, due largely to the growing strength of Marxist rebels”

I deduced from this incident that the liquidity of the NY Stock Exchange was sufficiently dependent on high margin cocaine profits (BIG PERCENT) that the Chairman of the New York Stock Exchange was willing for Associated Press to acknowledge he is making “cold calls” in rebel controlled peace zones in Colombian villages. “Cold calls” is what we used to call new business visits we would pay to people we had not yet done business with when I was on Wall Street.

I presume Grasso’s trip was not successful in turning the cash flow tide. Hence, Plan Colombia is proceeding apace to try to move narco deposits out of FARC’s control and back to the control of our traditional allies and, even if that does not work, to move Citibank’s market share and that of the other large US banks and financial institutions steadily up in Latin America.

http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/HL0202/S00069.htm

And here’s a small fraction of the nightmare that drug lord bill clinton’s plan colombia has unleashed:

http://www.earthisland.org/journal/index.php/eij/article/monsanto_and_the_drug_war/

It’s important to understand that the “drug war” they’re waging in latin america has nothing to do with stopping the flow of drugs.  It’s all about ensuring that the proceeds from the drugs are laundered through wall street.  It’s about market share.  Uncooperative growers like FARC are killed.

If a ‘narcodemocracy’ means that the government is completely corrupt, that the government is involved in drugs, that the influence of drug traffickers reaches the top levels of government, then the United States is a ‘narcodemocracy’.”

Michael Levine, 25 year DEA veteran
Author of “The Big White Lie: The CIA and the Cocaine/Crack Epidemic”

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